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NIGHT PROWLER

NIGHT PROWLER

SAGUARO BOB

SAGUARO BOB

ON GUARD

ON GUARD

RATTLED

RATTLED

ROADRUNNER

ROADRUNNER COYOTE MOON

COYOTE MOON

DESERT TORTOISE

DESERT TORTOISE

LEADER OF THE PACK

LEADER OF THE PACK

WHERE BUFFALO ROAM

WHERE BUFFALO ROAM

OH, MAMA

OH, MAMA

SMILING WOLF

SMILING WOLF

MEXICAN SQUIRREL

MEXICAN SQUIRREL

CATALINA BIG HORN

CATALINA BIG HORN

FISHY BUSINESS

FISHY BUSINESS

JACK AND JILL

JACK AND JILL

FAMILY PORTRAIT

FAMILY PORTRAIT

LA FAMILIA

LA FAMILIA

MOONLIGHT MUSE

MOONLIGHT MUSE

OUT FOR A STROLL

OUT FOR A STROLL

STRIPED SKUNK

STRIPED SKUNK

DEER & FAWN

DEER & FAWN

NIGHT FEEDERS

NIGHT FEEDERS

QUAIL & ALOE

QUAIL & ALOE

LOUNGING LIZARD

LOUNGING LIZARD

#top CANYON TREE FROG

CANYON TREE FROG

CATS AND DOGS

BACHELOR PARTY

THREE TENORS

THREE TENORS

BRAYER MEETING

BRAYER MEETING

RAVEN'S COUNCIL

RAVEN'S COUNCIL THE THREE TENORS

THREE TENORS

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NEW! NEW! NEW! The roadrunner (genus Geococcyx), also known as a chaparral bird or chaparral cock, is a fast-running ground cuckoo that has a long tail and a crest. It is found in the southwestern United States and Mexico, usually in the desert. Some have been clocked at 20 miles per hour. The roadrunner is an opportunistic omnivore. Its diet normally consists of insects (such as grasshoppers, crickets, caterpillars, and beetles), small reptiles (such as lizards, collared lizards, and snakes, including rattlesnakes), rodents and small mammals, spiders (including tarantulas), scorpions, centipedes, snails, small birds (and nestlings), eggs, and fruits and seeds like those from prickly pear cactuses and sumacs. The roadrunner forages on the ground and, when hunting, usually runs after prey from under cover. It may leap to catch insects, and commonly batters certain prey against the ground. The desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii and Gopherus morafkai) are two species of tortoise native to the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico and the Sinaloan thornscrub of northwestern Mexico. G. agassizii is distributed in western Arizona, southeastern California, southern Nevada, and southwestern Utah. Desert tortoises live about 50 to 80 years; they grow slowly and generally have low reproductive rates. They spend most of their time in burrows, rock shelters, and pallets to regulate body temperature and reduce water loss. They are most active after seasonal rains and are inactive during most of the year. This inactivity helps reduce water loss during hot periods, whereas winter hibernation facilitates survival during freezing temperatures and low food availability. Desert tortoises can tolerate water, salt, and energy imbalances on a daily basis, which increases their lifespans. A peccary (also javelina or skunk pig) is a medium-sized hoofed mammal of the family Tayassuidae (New World pigs) in the suborder Suina along with the Old World pigs, Suidae. They are found throughout Central and South America and in the southwestern area of North America. Peccaries usually measure between 3.0 and 4.3 ft in length, and a full-grown adult usually weighs about 44 to 88 lb. By rubbing the tusks together, they can make a chattering noise that warns potential predators not to get too close. Like a pig, it has a snout ending in a cartilaginous disc, and eyes that are small relative to its head. Peccaries are omnivores, and will eat insects, grubs, and occasionally small animals, although their preferred foods consist of roots, grasses, seeds, fruit, and cacti—particularly prickly pear. The American bison (Bison bison), also commonly known as the American buffalo or simply buffalo, is a North American species of bison that once roamed the grasslands of North America in massive herds. They became nearly extinct by a combination of commercial hunting and slaughter in the 19th century and introduction of bovine diseases from domestic cattle, and have made a recent resurgence largely restricted to a few national parks and reserves. Bison are herbivores, grazing on the grasses and sedges of the North American prairies. Their daily schedule involves two-hour periods of grazing, resting, and cud chewing, then moving to a new location to graze again. Bison are among the most dangerous animals encountered by visitors to the various U.S. and Canadian national parks and will attack humans if provoked. They appear slow because of their lethargic movements, but can easily outrun humans; bison have been observed running as fast as 40 mph. The bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) is a species of sheep native to North America named for its large horns. These horns can weigh up to 30 lb, while the sheep themselves weigh up to 300 lb. Bighorn sheep are named for the large, curved horns borne by the rams (males). Ewes (females) also have horns, but they are shorter with less curvature. They range in color from light brown to grayish or dark, chocolate brown, with a white rump. Bighorn sheep live in large herds, and do not typically follow a single leader ram. In 1936, the Arizona Boy Scouts mounted a statewide campaign to save the bighorn sheep. The desert bighorn sheep is now the official mascot for the Arizona Boy Scouts. The canyon tree frog (Hyla arenicolor) is a species of tree frog native to the rocky plateau areas of southern United States, primarily in New Mexico and Arizona, but it also ranges to Utah, Texas, and Colorado. Canyon tree frogs grow to 2 inches in length, and are typically brown, grey-brown, or grey-green in color, often with darker-colored blotching. They can vary considerably, but usually match the soil or rock coloration of their native habitats to serve as camouflage. Those from limestone habitats are lighter colored, and those from regions composed mostly of granite can even be pink in coloration. Most have bright yellow in their groin regions, and faded banding on their legs. Canyon tree frogs are mostly nocturnal and carnivorous. They are typically found in semiarid, rocky habitats near a permanent water source. Breeding occurs during the spring rains, and large, floating egg masses of 100 or more eggs are laid on the water. During periods of low rainfall, the frogs will take refuge in rock crevices. DINING AT DAWN

DINING AT DAWN

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